Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Big plans, bright future

Adult Social Care and Health Select Committee Minutes

Date:
Tuesday, 16th January, 2018
Time:
4:00pm
Place:
Jim Cooke Conference Suite, Stockton Central Library, Church Road, Stockton TS18 1TU
 
Please note: all Minutes are subject to approval at the next Meeting

Attendance Details

Present:
Cllr Lisa Grainge (Chair), Cllr Norma Stephenson (sub for Cllr Lauriane Povey), Cllr Gillian Corr (sub for Cllr Kevin Faulks), Cllr Evaline Cunningham, Cllr Lynn Hall, Cllr Mrs Sylvia Walmsley, Cllr Mohammed Javed
Officers:
Ann Workman, Tanja Braun, Mandy Mackinnon (A&H); Rose Hammond-McKie (FB); Peter Mennear, Annette Sotheby (DCE)
In Attendance:
Ann Baxter (Tees Safeguarding Adult Board)
Apologies for absence:
Cllr Kevin Faulks, Cllr Lauriane Povey, Cllr John Gardner
Item Description Decision
Public
ASH
75/17
EVACUATION PROCEDURE
 
ASH
76/17
DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST
 
ASH
77/17
MONITORING THE IMPACT OF PREVIOUS REVIEWS

 
ASH
78/17
CARE QUALITY COMMISSION (CQC) INSPECTION OUTCOMES
 
ASH
79/17
TEESWIDE ADULT SAFEGUARDING BOARD - ANNUAL REPORT 2016-17
 
ASH
80/17
SCRUTINY REVIEW OF GAMBLING
 
ASH
81/17
HEALTH AND WELLBEING BOARD MINUTES
 
ASH
82/17
WORK PROGRAMME 2017-18
 
ASH
83/17
CHAIR'S UPDATE
 
4:00 pm/6:00 pm

Preamble

ItemPreamble
ASH
75/17
The evacuation procedure was noted.
ASH
76/17
There were no declarations of interest.
ASH
77/17
Review of Defibrillators

Members were asked to consider and agree the Action Plan on Review of Defibrillators, the key points as follows:-

- The development of a communication plan to promote prevention of heart disease and encourage attendance for Healthy Heart Check.
- Increase public awareness and confidence in the use of CPR and defibrillators, promoting the message through Stockton News.
- Work with local community centres and local area partnerships to access first aid/CPR training, for example Heart Start provided by Cleveland Fire Service, to encourage local residents to be community first responders.
- Work with BHF, Cleveland Fire Service and local school network to promote and support first aid training for all secondary and college students.
- To promote and raise awareness of BHFs school-based CPR training toolkits.
- Funding identified by Public Health to contribute to two defibrillators (one at Stockton Town Centre and a second location to be decided). Location of both to be agreed with NEAS who will provide two hours free training on installation.

Members questions and comments could be summarised as follows:-

- Councillors could promote public awareness of CPR training at resident/community groups. This would be reflected in an updated Plan.
- What training was available, as this could be expensive due to staff churn etc? It was noted that free initial training was provided by NEAS if a publicly accessible defibrillator was registered with them, whereby a log is kept by to ensure equipment is correctly maintained, if it has been used or requires new pads for example. When operating a defibrillator, step-by-step audio instructions are given once the equipment has been accessed, allowing it to be used by someone who had no training, although training was helpful.

AGREED:
That the Action Plan be agreed.
ASH
78/17
An update was given including inspection reports from October to December 2017, key points as follows:-

- 16 reports were published in total during the quarter.
- 13 Adult Care services were reported - 7 of which rated as Good (including two SBC providers), 5 rated as Requires Improvement and one rated as Inadequate (Allison House)
- No reports were released on Primary Medical Care.
- Three reports on Hospital/Other Care - one rated Outstanding (Nuffield), one rated Good and one not rated.

Attention was drawn to the additional information on previous ratings now included in the quarterly data.

Members comments and questions could be summarised as follows:-

- Concerns still remained regarding Allison House (previously rated Requires Improvement and now rated Inadequate). Also Kirkdale (previously rated Good and now Requires Improvement). Of particular concern were some of the Borough's most vulnerable residents with alzheimers and dementia who, it was felt, deserved a better service. It was noted that often improvements may have been made after inspection, however the overall rating would remained unchanged until the next planned programme of inspection, and sustained improvements were needed for ratings to improve. A further update would be provided following the meeting.
- Members requested that a clearer narrative of action taken or outstanding be included in future inspection outcome reports.
- Following re-inspection, did the CQC take action if there was no improvement on a Requires Improvement rating? It was noted that inspectors would make a judgement on the level of risk and give a reasonable timescale to carry out specific actions. Assurances were given that there was ongoing involvement and close liaison with Allison House with the Council's Safeguarding Team, and a monthly meeting held with the directors and CQC.
- Concerns were expressed that Kirkdale were experiencing difficulty in recruiting a registered manager after a period of over 6 months, and what would happen if a suitable candidate could not be found? It was noted that advice had been given by the Council, for example where to advertise and level of pay to attract a suitably qualified person.
- A professional consultant had been brought in by CQC and work is ongoing with directors to carry out improvements.

AGREED:
1) That an update be provided with regard to Allison House and Kirkdale.
2) That further details of actions taken or outstanding be included in future inspection outcome reports, with particular regard to Requires Improvement/Inadequate ratings.
ASH
79/17
Members were asked to consider the Teeswide Adult Safeguarding Board Annual Report 2016-17, together with the Strategic Plan for 2017-18, the key points as follows:-

- The Board brings together four local authorities, health, police and a wide range of partners into a safeguarding network to work collaboratively to ensure effective use of resources, sharing and analysing information to better protect adults from abuse.
- A quality audit framework was carried out last year for the first time, asking each of the statutory authorities to undertake an audit of their safeguarding activity to compare with standard legislation. There were two common themes across all organisations:
1) The need to focus on hard to reach communities
2) To raise awareness of adult safeguarding (vulnerable people from age 18 upwards), with particular focus on better understanding of self-neglect and modern slavery.
- The importance of a clear line of sight (strategy to practitioners to public)
to raise awareness and ensure people understand how to access services, particularly websites and social media where there had been 6,900 users via Facebook.
- There was a slight increase in safeguarding referrals - a possible reason could be that more people were taking action due to their increased awareness of safeguarding issues.
- Partners are working together sharing information on problems and concerns. Lessons had been learned and shared across Tees. An Adult Serious Case Review had been held regarding the Hartlepool case of a murder of a very vulnerable lady.
- There was concern relating to those aged 30 to 50 years with mental health, substance misuse or alcohol issues, who do not meet the threshold for services, but give cause for concern.
- The combination of partners working together and sharing information would continue to be a priority going forward.

Members comments and questions could be summarised as follows:-

- Recent arrests across Teesside involving alleged sexual exploitation of young people were worrying. In response it was noted that this highlighted one of the challenges of the Adult Board, as often adolescents continue to be exploited and vulnerable, stressing the importance of information sharing between Adults and Children's Services.
- Was the reason for the higher proportion of enquiries conducted in Stockton care homes compared to other local areas due to unnecessary reporting, or because Stockton has more problems? It was explained that although there were standard policies and procedures for data reporting, it was interpreted differently - for example, all concerns are assumed to be of a safeguarding nature in Stockton, whereas Hartlepool do not class such concerns as a safeguarding issue until an investigation confirms this. Members felt it preferable to err on the side of caution and investigate all reported issues. Work was ongoing on local authority data reporting and Members would be updated as this progressed. Officers were buddying up with other Local Authorities and this had highlighted different practices.
- How do we identify and help those who suffer abuse and do not recognise it as such? For example, young girls who do not realise they are being abused or aged parents who have an adult son or daughter living with them and constantly beg for money. The parent may be too frightened to challenge this for fear of being left alone. It was reported that domestic abuse continued to be the most common call-out for Cleveland Police continued to be for domestic abuse. A conference had been held which discussed how many elderly people had lived with a long-term level of abuse, sometimes violent, with an adult child who may have a drug or alcohol problem. This highlights the need for raising awareness of the services available to help.
- Concerns were expressed about the problem of slavery and exploitation which seemed more prevalent today than ever before.

AGREED:
1) That Members be updated on local authority data reporting as this progressed.
2) The Annual Report be noted.
ASH
80/17
Members were provided with an update on work to inform the review:

- A map of gambling premises in the area had been developed which included gaming machines, bingo premises, betting shops and pubs, with areas of deprivation in the borough outlined.
- Additional information would be sought to further identify the risks of gambling among young people, including liaison with Education colleagues on a bi-annual survey in secondary schools to include questions about gambling. In addition, services that work with young people would be engaged with to see how often gambling was an identified issue.
- Liaison with CAB and Infinity Partnership was ongoing. Information gathered would be more beneficial than relying on anecdotal evidence. It was proposed to undertake spot checks during a defined period to assess how much of an issue gambling was in relation to financial inclusion primarily focusing on the development of a structured conversation, prompting dialogue when adults seek help for gambling problems or where gambling debts are identified.
- Financial organisations and local license operators would be invited to future meetings to obtain feedback.
- A behind-the-scenes visit to a casino and a session on the impact of gambling among young people would be arranged.
- A potential visit from an Edinburgh based youth project could be arranged.

Members comments and questions could be summarised as follows:-

- There was concern about the amount of money spent, including young mothers, on the bulk-buying of scratch cards that were easily available in shops. It was noted that information on scratch cards was not included in current data, however Licensing were investigating under-age gambling, and details would be fed back to the Committee.
- On-line games such as Candy Crush were addictive, and it was worrying that people get into debt buying add-ons after an initial free of charge introductory game. Some young people were falling asleep in class after spending too much time playing on-line games.
- Gambling advertisements were of concern, particularly on daytime TV when young children are exposed to numerous adverts for bingo which make it seem fun and attractive.
- Concern was expressed at the number of betting shops situated in the more deprived areas of the borough.
- Discussion took place on the legislation around ID and the purchase of scratch cards. It was noted that implementation of the law could put stress on shop staff who may incur a criminal record after failing to challenge older looking young people.

AGREED:
1) That Members be updated on local authority data reporting as this ongoing work progressed.
2) The proposed work with young people and financial inclusion services be taken forward.
ASH
81/17
Members were asked to consider the minutes of the meetings held in May, July, September and October 2017.

AGREED:
That the minutes be noted.
ASH
82/17
Members were advised of the deadline of end-January for Scrutiny Committee topics for 2018-19.

Next meeting to be held on 13th February 2018.

AGREED ĘC that the work programme be noted.
ASH
83/17
The Chair had nothing further to report.

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