Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Big plans, bright future

Arts Leisure & Culture Select Committee Minutes

Date:
Wednesday, 15th October, 2014
Time:
1.30pm
Place:
Jim Cooke Suite, Stockton Central Library, Church Road, Stockton-on-Tees TS18 1TU
 
Please note: all Minutes are subject to approval at the next Meeting

Attendance Details

Present:
Cllr Mrs Jean O'Donnell(Chairman), Cllr Eileen Johnson(Vice-Chairman), Cllr Carol Clark, Cllr Nigel Cooke, Cllr Gillian Corr
Officers:
Reuben Kench(DNS), Sarah Bowman(Public Health), Judith Trainer, Jenna McDonald(LD)
In Attendance:
Ruth Benson, Carole Wilson (SNAPS)
Apologies for absence:
Cllr Alan Lewis, Cllr Ray McCall
Item Description Decision
Public
ALC
15/14
EVACUATION PROCEDURE
 
ALC
16/14
DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST
 
ALC
17/14
MINUTES FOR SIGNATURE - 4TH JUNE 2014
AGREED that the minutes were signed by the Chairman as a correct record.
ALC
18/14
DRAFT MINUTES - 16TH JULY 2014
AGREED that the minutes be approved.
ALC
19/14
REVIEW OF THE EFFECTS OF THE ARTS, LEISURE AND CULTURE ON WELLBEING
AGREED that the information be noted.
ALC
20/14
WORK PROGRAMME
AGREED that the information be noted.

Preamble

ItemPreamble
ALC
15/14
The evacuation procedure was noted.
ALC
16/14
Cllr Nigel Cooke declared an interest as he was a Member of Tees, Esk and Wear Valleys NHS Foundation Trust(TEWV)
ALC
17/14
The minutes of the meeting held on 4th June 2014 were signed by the Chairman as a correct record.
ALC
18/14
Consideration was given to the draft minutes of the meeting held on 16th July 2014.
ALC
19/14
Members received a presentation from representatives from Special Needs Activities with Parent's Support (SNAPS).

The key points were highlighted together as follows:

- SNAPS became a group 15 years ago and over the last two and half years became a charity

- Activities and sessions were held during term time and in the summer holidays

- Not only did parents get involved but also other relatives such as brothers and sisters, aunts and uncles and grandparents

Activities and sports which SNAPS carried out were:

- Football
- Swimming
- Ice-Skating
- Art's & Craft's
- Soft Play
- Climbing Walls
- Play and Learn Centres
- Big Chef, Little Chef

- Each person paid an affordable 1 contribution each time they attended a session. It was highlighted that people liked to pay their way

- SNAPS sessions were carried out in a variety of venues such as Youth Clubs and Church Halls as well as local parks

The Committee heard that the benefits of SNAPS sessions included:

- Confidence building
- Encouraging networking support between families
- Encouraged family experiences and relationship building

SNAPS were a self-funded organisation and had received donations from private sponsors as well as SBC Public Health, they had also been named as Charity of the year in 2013 at a local Sainsbury's store. It was highlighted that SNAPS also received funding from events such as The Boxing Day Dip, The Great North Run and The Rat Race.

The Committee heard that SNAPS held MB Awards annually in Memory of Michael Benson. The Awards focussed on celebrating and recognising achievements. The MB Awards included:

- Sporting Achievements
- Personal Achievements
- Supporting Achievements

All individuals involved in sessions and activities received some form of recognition.

The following points and questions were raised by the Committee:

- The enthusiasm and compassion from the Officers at SNAPS was extremely positive
- SNAPS were enabling people to do activities that others do
- It would be useful to understand how SNAPS helps to bring on individuals and any case studies about people who had been helped by SNAPS where other services had failed to have an impact
- It was refreshing to learn that SNAPS was not a drop off service but was based on families playing and learning together
- Parents benefited from the sessions as they had the opportunity to speak to other parents in their position

Officers from SNAPS responded to some of the questions which were raised by Members as follows:

- After every session an evaluation form was completed by each person that took part to identify strengths and weaknesses in the session

Officers from SNAPS agreed to send case studies on the positive impact of SNAPS activities to the Committee following the meeting.

Members received a presentation on Creative Therapies in Mental Health Treatment: Children from a Consultant in Public Health. The key points were highlighted as follows:

- Mental Health problems and illnesses were common

- Depression was common in Young People

- It is often difficult to diagnose a mental illness in an individual who is also depressed

- Creative Therapists were trained Psychotherapists with further specialisation in Music, Art, Dance or Drama

- The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) stated that arts therapists should be registered with Health and Care Professions Council and have experience of working with symptoms of psychosis

- Creative therapies have been shown to help in the treatment of people with schizophrenia. In England, those who had schizophrenia had limited access to art therapy on the National Health Service(NHS)

- promoting good mental health contributed to preventing mental illness and to better outcomes in physical health, health behaviours, educational performance, employability/earnings and crime reduction

- It was possible for GP's to refer people to non-medical support within the community through the 'social prescribing' initiative which included physical activity, self-help and more as detailed in the presentation

Members raised the following points and questions:

- The difficulties were in proving the case for creative therapies and the lack of evidence
- Whether there was any evidence regarding the number of hospital admissions or reduced reliance on medication as a result of Creative Therapies
- How people were choosing to spend personalised budgets

Officers responded to the points and questions raised by the Committee as follows:

- Some National evidence was available to say that Creative Therapy had reduced waiting lists for Counsellors

- It was possible to demonstrate that Creative Therapies had values and benefits, however it was difficult to demonstrate how beneficial the therapies had been

- Comparative value was much easier to demonstrate than values alone

- (NICE) made it clear that Creative Therapies should always be considered as an option

- Some of the causes of mental illness included; family breakdown, school, domestic abuse and substance misuse

- When considering Creative Therapies, it was important to make connection to what was considered to be the cause of a condition e.g. if an individual did not know how to control something they could be given experience in control

- Mental Health conditions and depression could be caused and/or triggered by a combination of factors including organic and chemical changes in the brain
ALC
20/14
The Work Programme was noted by the Committee.

Members heard that an additional meeting was to be scheduled to take place in December 2014.

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