Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Big plans, bright future

Cleveland Police and Crime Panel Minutes

Date:
Tuesday, 13th November, 2018
Time:
5.00 p.m.
Place:
Cleveland Room 1, Community Safely Hub, Cliffland Way, Hemlington, Middlesbrough, TS8 9GL
 
Please note: all Minutes are subject to approval at the next Meeting

Attendance Details

Present:
Cllr Norma Stephenson O.B.E (Chair), Cllr Charles Rooney (Vice-Chairman), Cllr David Coupe, Cllr David Harrington, Cllr Ian Jeffrey, Mr Paul McGrath, Cllr Matthew Vickers, Cllr David Wilburn and Cllr Lewis Young.
Officers:
Julie Butcher, Judy Trainer and Peter Bell (Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council).
In Attendance:
Barry Coppinger (Commissioner), Joanne Hodgkinson (Commissioner's Office), Chief Constable Mike Veale (Cleveland Police). Cllr Andrew Stephenson (Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council).
Apologies for absence:
Cllr Alec Brown, Cllr Lesley Hamilton, Cllr Chris Jones and Cllr Katie Trueman.
Item Description Decision
Public
PCP
30/18
DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST
Councillor Norma Stephenson declared a personal non prejudicial interest in respect of agenda item 12 - Commissioners Update as her son was involved in the delivery of Injectable Opioid Treatment.
PCP
31/18
MINUTES OF THE MEETING HELD ON 18 SEPTEMBER 2018 AND ATTENDANCE MATRIX
RESOLVED that the minutes of the meeting held on 18 September 2018 be agreed.
PCP
32/18
POLICE AND FIRE PANEL CONFERENCE - VERBAL UPDATE
RESOLVED that the Police and Fire Panel Conference Verbal Update be noted.
PCP
33/18
MEMBERS' QUESTIONS TO THE POLICE AND CRIME COMMISSIONER
RESOLVED that the Members' Questions to the Police and Crime Commissioner session be noted.
PCP
34/18
SCRUTINY REVIEW - TACKLING OFF-ROAD MOTORBIKE NUISANCE
RESOLVED that the report be received and the recommendation be noted.
PCP
35/18
SCRUTINY REVIEW OF GAMBLING BY STOCKTON-ON-TEES BOROUGH COUNCIL'S ADULT SOCIAL CARE AND HEALTH SELECT COMMITTEE
RESOLVED that the report be noted.
PCP
36/18
APPOINTMENT OF NON POLITICAL INDEPENDENT MEMBER
RESOLVED that the recommendation of the Appointment Sub Panel for the appointment of Chris Walker as a Non-Political Independent Member to the Police and Crime Panel be accepted, the appointment of that person confirmed and the Home Secretary be notified accordingly.
PCP
37/18
PCC'S SCRUTINY PROGRAMME AND PERFORMANCE REPORT
RESOLVED that the report be noted.
PCP
38/18
POLICE AND CRIME PLAN
RESOLVED that the Police and Crime Plan be noted.
PCP
39/18
DECISIONS OF THE POLICE AND CRIME COMMISSIONER
RESOLVED that the report be noted.
PCP
40/18
COMMISSIONER'S UPDATE
RESOLVED that the report be noted.
PCP
41/18
PROGRAMME OF ENGAGEMENT FOR POLICE AND CRIME COMMISSIONER
RESOLVED that the report be noted.
PCP
42/18
ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PANEL - INITIAL DISCUSSION
RESOLVED that the Chair and Vice Chair commence work on an Annual Report of the Panel and that an initial draft be presented to the next meeting of the Panel.
PCP
43/18
FORWARD PLAN
RESOLVED that the Forward Plan for the Panel be noted.
PCP
44/18
PUBLIC QUESTIONS
 
5.00 p.m. to 7.00 p.m.

Preamble

ItemPreamble
PCP
31/18
Consideration was given to the minutes of the meeting held on 18 September 2018.
PCP
32/18
The Chair and Vice Chair updated Members with regard to the Police and Fire Panel Conference that had recently taken place at Warwick University. Mark Burns-Williamson (Chair of the Association of Police and Crime Commissioners) and Sara Thornton (Chair of the National Police Chief's Council) had given presentations at the conference. The Chair felt that it was a worthwhile event that gave an opportunity to speak to other Panel members from across the country. The Chair would forward Panel Members a copy of the presentation from Sara Thornton.

It was reported at the conference that the Home Office had challenged the payment of the affiliation fee to the National Association of Police and Crime Panels. The Home Office had said that there was a clause in the regulations for Police and Crime Panels that restricted Police and Crime Panels from spending money that didn't benefit the Force area that the Panel represented.

The Panel agreed that the Chair should write to the Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service and the local MPs in support of joining the National Association of Police and Crime Panels and incurring the affiliation fee as being part of a National Association that shared best practice, training & development sessions, seminars and networking opportunities did benefit the Force area that the Panel represent.

The Chair reported that she would like to look at Member Champions for the Panel. Each member Champion would be responsible for a different area within the Commissioner's Police and Crime Plan. Further details would be presented to a future meeting.
PCP
33/18
A question was raised about Chief Constable Veale's plan to remove 2 ranks from within Cleveland Police and how the organisation had been allowed to become top heavy. In response it was reported previous Chief Constables had their own way of managing resources and had different approaches to how they wanted the Force to be shaped. The Chief Constable outlined that he felt that the 11 layers of management between himself and his officers was excessive. The Chief Constable drew on his knowledge of private sector companies and how they operated. The Chief Constable was approaching this from an efficiency and commercial perspective. The Chief Constable was speaking from experience of removing 3 ranks from his previous position at Wiltshire Police. The benefits looking back were massive and significant as it created accountability, responsibility, visibility and engagement and this benefited frontline resources. Messages from the Chief Constable would be clearer and this would drive up efficiency helping to create a vibrant efficient service that drives up trust and confidence in the leadership.

A question was raised about Neighbourhood Policing and the format of the service. In response the Commissioner reported there would a report presented to a future meeting of the Panel on the new management structures within Cleveland Police.
PCP
34/18
Members were presented with a report on Tackling Off-Road Motorbike Nuisance that had been prepared by a Task and Finish Group.

The Task and Finish Group was established in response to Member concerns and a desire to feed into the development of a Cleveland-wide strategy to tackle off road vehicle anti-social nuisance and seek to secure partnership buy-in.

The Task and Finish Group met on 15 November 2017 to receive an initial overview of the problem and an update on the new approaches to tacking the problem including Operation Endurance. This was followed by a meeting with the Police and Crime Commissioner on 22 January 2018 and a final meeting on 27 September to receive an update on the Cleveland roll out of Operation Endurance following the peak season.

The overall conclusions from the Task and Finish Group were that it supported the new approach in particular:

• the partnership approach which was felt to be key in addressing this issue
• the importance of working with registered social landlords
• the power of a strong media campaign highlighting seizures and publicising prosecutions
• the effectiveness of S59 Notices to enable immediate seizure of vehicles following unauthorised use
• the valuable role of School Liaison Officers in targeted areas
• Neighbourhood Police presence in estates where there was a known problem
• having a Facebook page for the public to share information without having to call 101
• better intelligence

The recommendation from the Task and Finish Group was that it recognised the valuable work carried out by Cleveland Police including work carried out as part of Operation Endurance and recommended that this issue is monitored on an annual basis by the Police and Crime Panel.

Members welcomed the recommendation and it was agreed that the report be shared with the Force area Local Authorities.
PCP
35/18
Members were presented with a report Scrutiny Review of Gambling by Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council's Adult Social Care and Health Select Committee for information.

Members welcomed the report and it was agreed that the report be shared with colleagues at Redcar and Cleveland Borough Council.

The Commissioner reported that he would look at including gambling issues within his Police and Crime Plan.
PCP
36/18
Consideration was given to a report that related to the appointment of a replacement Non Political Independent co-opted member to the Cleveland Police and Crime Panel ("the Panel"), under provisions within the Police Reform and Social Responsibility Act 2011.

At its meeting on 3 July 2018 the Panel agreed arrangements for the appointment of a replacement Non-Political Independent Member (NPIM), following the resignation of one of the two existing NPIMs.

As part of the arrangements the Panel appointed 5 members to service on a Sub Panel, which would consider applications, undertake interviews and make recommendations with regard to the appointment. The Panel comprised:

Cllr Norma Stephenson (Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council)
Cllr Lesley Hamilton (Hartlepool Borough Council)
Cllr Chris Jones (Redcar & Cleveland Borough Council)
Cllr Matthew Vickers (Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council)
Cllr Lewis Young (Middlesbrough Council)

The position was widely advertised throughout the Cleveland Police area and individuals requested application forms. Completed application forms were received by the deadline and it was agreed that all the applicants be offered the opportunity of interview. Two interviews took place on 24 October and a further two interviews took place immediately prior to this meeting of the Panel. The Chair therefore provided the Panel with a verbal report on the outcome of the interview process.

The newly appointed NPIM's first meeting of the Panel would be 5 February 2019.

The term of office of the NPIM would be for the period beginning on the day of this Panel meeting and expiring on 1 February 2021.
PCP
37/18
Consideration was given to a report that provided an update on the PCC's scrutiny programme and present the performance report of the Police and Crime Commissioner and the Police and Crime Plan.

The Commissioner's objectives were as follows:

• Investing in our Police;
• A Better Deal for Victims and Witnesses;
• Tackling Re-offending;
• Working Together to Make Cleveland Safer; and
• Securing the Future of our Communities.

The report updated Panel members on performance associated with the delivery of the Commissioner's objectives, the wider aspects of the Police and Crime Plan and his statutory responsibilities.

Holding the Chief Constable to account was the key duty of the Police & Crime Commissioner and must encompass all of the functions of the Chief Constable and functions of those who were under the Chief Constable's direction and control: this meant, particularly:-

- How the Chief Constable discharges his duty to have regard to the Police and Crime Plan;
- How the Chief Constable has regard to national and regional Strategic Policing Requirement (SPR);
- How the Chief Constable complies with the law generally and police codes of practice in particular;
- How the Chief Constable deals with his functions in relation to the handling of complaints against the police;
- The effectiveness and efficiency of Cleveland Police's work in relation to collaboration and partnership;
- How effective and efficient the police arrangements are for engagement with local people;
- How well Cleveland Police achieves value for money in all that it does;
- How Cleveland Police addresses its equality and diversity duties; and
- How Cleveland Police deals with its responsibilities, working in partners, in respect of safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children.

The scrutiny of the Force was one of the main responsibilities of the Commissioner as set out in the Police and Social Responsibility Act 2011. Delivered through the Commissioner's standards and scrutiny programme effective checks and balances were undertaken through a schedule of regular meetings.

Since the last Police and Crime Panel the PCC had held the following meeting;-

Scrutiny, Performance and Delivery meetings

• 12 September 2018

The minutes of the above meetings were attached to the report.

Since the last update to the Panel there had been a Working Together meetings on the:-

• 26 September

The minutes of the meeting were attached to the report.

In addition to the meetings above, the Commissioner continued to attend the following to complement his scrutiny programme:

- Daily review of the Control Room and Serious Incident Logs;
- Weekly accountability meetings with the Chief Constable;
- Monthly crime performance monitoring;
- Attendance at the Force's monthly Force Performance Group; and
- Attend at least one local area meeting in each of Cleveland's neighbourhood police team areas.

An overview of the performance information from the Police and Crime Plan had been circulated to Members prior to the meeting.
PCP
38/18
Members were provided with a copy of the Police and Crime Plan.

The Plan built on the Commissioners first Plan that he had published when elected in 2012, updated to reflect the emerging needs of the public and was responsive to the new and emerging threats that were faced. The Commissioner had placed a fresh emphasis on preventing violence and abuse, cyber-crime and fraud, improving the criminal justice processes, early intervention and prevention.
PCP
39/18
Consideration was given to a report that provided Members with an update on decisions made by the PCC and the Forward Plan.

The PCC made all decisions unless specifically delegated within the Scheme of Consent / Delegation. All decisions demonstrated that they were soundly based on relevant information and that the decision making process was open and transparent.

In addition, a forward plan was included and published on the PCC website which included items requiring a decision in the future. This was attached to the report.

Each decision made by the PCC was recorded on a decision record form with supporting background information appended. Once approved it was published on the PCC website.

Decisions relating to private / confidential matters would be recorded; although, it may be appropriate that full details were not published.

Decisions made since the last meeting of the Police and Crime Panel were attached to the report.

A question was raised about the launch of Restorative Cleveland and if this was the same programme as a previous programme called Restorative Justice. In response it was noted that it was the same programme but it had been re-launched as Cleveland had been given a national award with accredited status. A team had been seconded to Cleveland Police for 6 months to develop the Restorative Cleveland approach and then it had been put out to tender.
PCP
40/18
Consideration was given to a report that provided an update in relation to key matters since the previous meeting in September including;

- Fair funding for Cleveland Police
- E-CINs
- Everyone Matters
- Anti-extremism
- Modern Slavery
- Criminal Justice Updates:-
- Injectable Opioid Treatment (Heroin Assisted Treatment)
- Cleveland Divert

The PCC had written to Cleveland's six MPs to set out the reality of Cleveland Police's operational and financial situation, following eight years of government cuts, ahead of the Government's budget announcement on Monday 29th October. Appended to the report was a copy of the letter and an analysis of the changing nature and complexity of demand in Cleveland.

Despite having some of the highest levels of victim-based crimes per head of population, Cleveland Police had lost 39m - or 36% - in real terms from its government grant over the last seven years. This had resulted in the loss of 500 police officers and 50 PCSOs since 2010, in the face of increasing demand from additional and complex crimes such as historical child sexual abuse and cybercrime. The force recorded 163 crimes per day on average, with levels of violent crime increasing by 45% in the last 12 months.

Reports from independent bodies such as the National Audit Office and the Home Affairs Select Committee had stated the case very clearly, if the tide didn't turn, police forces would struggle to deliver a service the public deserves.

The government must look urgently at their funding formula for policing, which had made Cleveland one of the most disadvantaged police forces in the country and threatens ability to protect the backbone of community safety, neighbourhood policing. The PCC urged the Members, whatever their political persuasion, to join him in the campaign for fairer funding for Cleveland Police.

With regard to E-CINS the PCC had committed to a wide ranging programme of engagement ‘Your Force, Your Voice' and this included engaging regularly with partners. Partners had often told the PCC that one of the biggest barriers to working more effectively together was information sharing. In response, the PCC had invested in E-CINS (Empowering Communities Inclusion and Neighbourhood management System) a web based, multi-agency information sharing and case management system. The system was most beneficial where multiple agencies were working together to support vulnerable individuals or resolve complex problems. In Cleveland, the ECINS system was used for Anti-social Behaviour (ASB), Troubled Families, Problem Solving Groups, street beggars, Victim First cases and vulnerable adults.

Work was underway to expand use of the system to include Integrated Offender Management (IOM) and Vulnerable, Exploited, Missing and Trafficked (VEMT) on E-CINS and there was potential for the system to expand even further into other areas such as: MARAC, Safeguarding and Early Intervention. The PCC had written to partners to encourage more organisations to sign up and to give an early update in terms of the progress being made and the benefits to our communities, a copy of the letter and analysis was attached to the report.

The PCC had made a long term commitment to equality and diversity through the establishment of a cultural change programme called Everyone Matters. The PCC was pleased to report that Cleveland Police was the first UK Force to be awarded the Gold Equality Standard by an independent Equality Organisation. Equality North East (ENE) was an independent not-for-profit company that worked across the whole of the North East region aiming to remove the barriers to employment and entry into employment facing minority and disadvantaged groups.

Equality North East had awarded Cleveland Police with the Gold Equality Standard, in recognition of the work undertaken to plan and promote good equality and diversity practices in the workplace. Principle components of the Standard were:-

• Business / leadership commitment to equality
• Policies and procedures that actively promote equality
• Promotion of a diverse culture

Everyone Matters Programme was a joint initiative between the Police and Crime Commissioner and Cleveland Police to embed the ethos of the Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Strategy in policy and practice. Everyone Matters incorporated a wide range of activities including cultural awareness raising sessions for front line staff, Talent Development Programme, investment in additional roles to cover diverse community engagement and hate crime investigation and diverse recruitment plan.

Diversi-tees - a mentoring programme in partnership with Teesside University. Mentors were from the Force and mentees students from the university. The programme helped students gain knowledge and experience of the world of work through work shadowing and other support.

The Community Safety Hub Photographic Competition was a successful community engagement campaign inviting community members to submit photography representative of the local area to be included in the design of the new Community Safety Hub building, ensuring that this purpose built facility reflects the character and diversity of the local area.

Staff Networks was the development of a range of support networks available to support and nurture officers and staff from within diverse communities, including Black & Asian Police Network, LGB&T group and Christian Police Association.

The PCC was delighted that the Force had been recognised for its progress in terms of equality and diversity and the PCC would be working closely with the Chief Constable to ensure that the Force continued to proactively develop its approach.

Following the appointment of Sara Khan, independent Anti-extremism commissioner, the PCC had had an introductory meeting to give her an overview of Cleveland and the work it was doing and structures that were in place. Sara was drawing up a programme on tackling extremism for publication in 2019, and would be consulting across the country in the autumn to feed into the programme.

The PCC had offered to organise an event here in Cleveland which would bring key partners together to explore and discuss ideas and which pulled together and reflected experiences, views, concerns, work done so far, and future demands locally. The PCC had also included in his revised Police and Crime Plan a commitment around these issues. The PCC would keep Members informed as this agenda was progressed.

At the previous meeting of the Panel, the PCC provided Members with an update on the Cleveland multi-agency Anti-Slavery Network. The network had been commissioned with the aim of:

• Understanding the scale of Modern Slavery (MS) and Human Trafficking (HT) across the Cleveland area
• Raising awareness of trafficking and MS
• Reducing the threat and harm of slavery
• Developing and delivering a multi-agency action plan to tackle Modern Slavery and Human Trafficking
• Encouraging a victim focussed approach and good practice in victim care
• Identifying gaps in current provision
• Developing intelligence / information sharing protocols between agencies

The national Human Trafficking and Modern Slavery Police Transformation Programme announced three funding opportunities for PCCs to bid into. Bids for up to 1000 each for three areas of focus, these being:

• Awareness Raising Events / Activities for Partners (2017/18)
• Awareness Raising Events / Activities for Businesses (2018/19)
• Awareness Raising Events / Activities for Partners (2018/19)

The PCC was successful in being awarded funding for partners in 2017/18 and businesses in 2018/19 with the outcome of the partnership activities in 2018/19 due shortly. Through the awarding of the first 1000 the anti-slavery network held a full day table-top exercise to generate discussion towards the development of a tees wide victim care pathway should victims of human trafficking and modern slavery be rescued. The event was a great success with key agencies feeding in their thoughts and views to ensure a victim focussed approach throughout. A sub group had been set up to compile agencies views and develop a process chart for agencies to utilise that is consistent and easy to follow.

The second funding award had just been announced, the plan was to engage with the North East Retail Crime Partnership and Local Trading Standards Departments to identify and develop an agenda for an event that would be of benefit to not only local businesses but to the wider membership of the network. By working in partnership with businesses the PCC aimed to enhance public safety and reduce harm to local businesses, industry and the economy.

The final opportunity related to the delivery of partnership training including; train the trainer sessions and awareness of the National Referral Mechanism.

With regard to Injectable Opioid Treatment (Heroin Assisted Treatment) it had been recognised that a radical change was needed to the way in response to drug-related crime, in order to achieve lasting and meaningful results. As discussed at the last meeting, it was estimated that a prolific cohort of 20 drug-dependent offenders in Middlesbrough had cost the public purse 784,000 over the last two years and that was only based on crimes that were detected. As a result, the PCC was working with Middlesbrough's Public Health Team and Durham Tees Valley Community Rehabilitation Company to become one of the first areas in the country to explore the use of Heroin Assisted Treatment (HAT), a scheme where offenders would receive a prescribed heroin replacement in a medically supervised facility and take part in a programme of education, employment and mental health support.

The PCC had written to the Home Secretary to ask for his support, a copy of the letter was attached to the report. The PCC had established a multi-agency working group to progress the pilot and with the full support from the Home Office, aimed to have the pilot in place by Spring 2019.

Cleveland OPCC were leading the way and introducing a new deferred prosecution option to first time and low level offenders The Divert team was led by a project manager from the Office of The Police and Crime Commissioner. The team were in post and comprise of: Project Manager (OPCC) Cleveland Police Team lead (acting police inspector), Durham, Tees Valley Community Rehabilitation Company Team Lead (Probation Officer), Durham, Tees Valley Community Rehabilitation Company Probation Service Officer and a Female and Complex Needs Specialist, A way out (seconded officer).

The project would ‘go live' on 1 January 2019 as a pilot working with shoplifting offences. Full implementation of the project which would include other offence types would start on 1 April 2019. The team work out of Community Safety Hub and were in the development phase of the project.

A project board had been established co-chaired by Cleveland Police Assistant Chief Constable, Jason Harwin and the PCC, Assistant Chief Executive, Joanne Hodgkinson. Quality assurance and scrutiny of the Cleveland Divert Cases would be provided by the Out of Court Disposal Scrutiny Meeting.

A question was raised about the very robust cross party criticism of funding of the police. In response it was noted that despite having some of the highest levels of victim-based crimes per head of population, Cleveland Police had lost 39m - or 36% - in real terms from its government grant over the last seven years. This had resulted in the loss of 500 police officers and 50 PCSOs since 2010, in the face of increasing demand from additional and complex crimes such as historical child sexual abuse and cybercrime. The force recorded 163 crimes per day on average, with levels of violent crime increasing by 45% in the last 12 months.

Reports from independent bodies such as the National Audit Office and the Home Affairs Select Committee had stated the case very clearly, if the tide didn't turn now, police forces would struggle to deliver a service the public deserves.

The government needed to look urgently at their funding formula for policing, which had made Cleveland one of the most disadvantaged police forces in the country and threatened its ability to protect the backbone of community safety, neighbourhood policing.


Members agreed that the Chair should write a letter to the Home Secretary in support of the Commissioner's letters that he had sent to Cleveland's six MPs to set out the reality of Cleveland Police's operational and financial situation, following eight years of government cuts.

With regard to Cleveland Divert, Members felt that they would like further updates on the pilot scheme that would be working with shoplifting offenders.

A question was raised about Sara Khan - independent Anti-extremism commissioner and her remit. In response it was noted that Sarah Kharn was an independently appointed person and Sara was drawing up a programme on tackling extremism.

With regard to the Heroin Assisted Treatment it was noted that there was a nation debate on-going with regard to drugs policies and the best way to tackle drug related issues.

Members discussed the possibility of retailers providing funding for Special Constables. It was noted that any funding possibilities would be looked at and any further information would be reported to a future meeting.
PCP
41/18
Consideration was given to a report that provided a brief update in relation to consultation and engagement activity of the PCC between September 2018 and November 2018. Future engagement work of the PCC was also be summarised.

The PCC's consultation and engagement activities focused on increasing understanding of the policing and community safety needs of the communities of Cleveland, ensuring that strategic planning effectively delivered the policing service that communities require.

The PCC attended a number of meetings on a regular basis with key partners, stakeholders and residents from across the Cleveland area.

In addition to this the PCC attended many regional and national meetings representing Cleveland.

The ‘Your Force Your Voice' engagement initiative continued to take place with community meetings in all of Cleveland's 79 ward areas being visited on an annual basis. Since coming into office in November 2012 the PCC had attended over 600 community meetings allowing him to better understand the needs of local communities across Cleveland.

On 16th October the PCC had his 600th Your Force Your Voice meeting since coming into office. This involved members of Parkfield Residents Association visiting the Control Room at the Community Safety Hub to gain a better understanding of how calls to 999 and 101 were prioritised and despatched. This followed an earlier meeting where concerns were raised regarding Control Room response when residents were reporting incidents. All those who attended the visit stated that it had increased their understanding of the triage and despatch process and the pressures faced in modern day policing. All felt it would improve their perceptions of future interactions with the Control Room, and better enable them to explain the process to other residents.

All of the issues raised at community meetings were raised with Cleveland Police for action where necessary.

Below is a summary of key other meetings attended by the PCC. The full diary was published on the PCC website.

On 10th September the PCC chaired the Tees Rural Crime Forum, which brought together rural community members and businesses with community safety partners with the joint aim of preventing and tackling rural crime. The Chief Constable also attended the meeting to launch the new Cleveland Police Rural Crime Strategy which had six key areas of focus, based upon the concerns raised by the rural community through engagement:

• Farm and agricultural crime, e.g. Diesel theft, burning of hay bales
• Road safety, e.g. speeding
• Serious and organised crime
• Rural isolation and vulnerability - focus on domestic abuse and mental health
• Wildlife crime
• Heritage crime - Eston Hills

On 13th September the PCC hosted a consultation event with partner agencies regarding the refreshed Police and Crime Plan. Representatives from over 30 organisations attended the event to give their thoughts on the actions needed to progress the PCC's five key priorities. Key areas of discussion were a greater commitment to integrated working, better use of digital solutions and clearer victim pathways. Feedback was incorporated in the refreshed plan.

On 15 September the PCC attended an event organised by Redcar and Cleveland Police Cadets to showcase an intergenerational project to develop a community garden space in Marske. The integration of the work of the cadets with mainstream policing was an area of focus for the OPCC and work was ongoing to further develop the scheme.

On 10 October the PCC attended a Diversity in Tees Conference, organised by the HALO Project. The focus of the event was on work needed to further develop race equality across the region, and the PCC had committed to working in conjunction with HALO to take this work forward. The event was followed by an employment fair targeted at the BAME community, which Cleveland Police Recruitment team attended to promote voluntary and paid opportunities for work within the Cleveland Police family.

On 12th October the PCC attended the BME Achievement Awards, organised by the HALO project and part funded by the PCC. The Cleveland and Durham PCC funded Victim Care and Advice Service was recognised at the awards for the work done in supporting victims of race hate crime and integrating Syrian arrivals into the local community through the government's resettlement scheme.

On 15 to 21 October marked National Hate Crime Awareness Week, which was promoted by the OPCC and Cleveland Police through use of social media and also through a number of targeted events, including:

• Showcasing the work of the two Hate Crime Investigators funded through PCC funding. Over 200 positive outcomes had been achieved in the year since they came into post, including the longest sentence obtained nationally for race hate propagated through social media. Their prompt action also led to the seizure of vital evidence in the national ‘Punish a Muslim' case which facilitated the conviction of the offender.

• Mini Police was a scheme aimed at Primary School pupils which was coordinated by the PCC funded School Liaison Officers. North Ormesby Primary Mini Police chose to focus their celebration assembly on hate crime to showcase their learning from the programme.

• Show Racism the Red Card Wear Red Day supported by the OPCC and Cleveland Police, this national event encouraged people to show their support for tackling racism by wearing red and donating to the North East charity Show Racism the Red Card's educational programme.

• Stalls in community buildings, raising awareness of what hate crime was, how to report it and the support available for victims.

On 25 October the PCC attended the North East Equality Awards to receive the Gold Equality Standard, in recognition of the work undertaken to plan and promote good equality and diversity practices in the workplace by Cleveland Police. Cleveland was the first UK Police Force to achieve an externally recognised equality standard. Key areas of best practice highlighted in the assessment report were:

• Everyone Matters Programme - a joint initiative between the PCC and Police to embed the ethos of the Equality, Diversity and Human Rights Strategy in policy and practice. Covers a wide range of activities including cultural awareness raising sessions for front line staff, Talent Development Programme, investment in additional roles to cover diverse community engagement and hate crime investigation and diverse recruitment plan.

• Diversi-tees a mentoring programme in partnership with Teesside University. Mentors were from the Force and mentees students from the university. The programme helped students gain knowledge and experience of the world of work through work shadowing and other support.

• Photographic Competition a successful community engagement campaign inviting community members to submit photography representative of the local area to be included in the design of the new Community Safety Hub building, ensuring that this purpose built facility reflects the character and diversity of the local area.

• Staff Networks the development of a range of support networks available to support and nurture officers and staff from within diverse communities, including Black & Asian Police Network, LGB&T group and Christian Police Association.

Engagement with young people had been identified as an area for expansion within the OPCC work programme. Engagement included ad-hoc events at schools and colleges and participation in the Crucial Crew event for Primary School children in one Local Authority area.

Two key areas of work had been identified:

• Specific consultation with young people to help shape commissioning and service development. This would initially be undertaken to help develop the Cleveland Divert Scheme, with targeted consultations in schools and colleges across Cleveland. A question set would be designed in conjunction with the Divert team to ensure that feedback obtained could be utilised to help shape the future direction of the scheme.

• Youth Proofed version of the Police and Crime Plan - The Commissioner's Officer for Consultation and Engagement would work with a targeted pool of Cleveland Police cadets from across all four Local Authority areas to produce a young person friendly version of the Police and Crime Plan for distribution to young people across Cleveland. This would involve going through the current Police and Crime Plan to identify the key areas of interest for young people, identifying key information required and working with a graphic designer to develop a young person friendly format.
PCP
42/18
The Chair and Vice Chair had held discussions on the possibility of the Panel producing an Annual Report for the Panel. Members felt that this would be good resource for the Panel to be able to show what it had achieved over the year.
PCP
43/18
Members were presented with the Forward Plan for the Panel.
PCP
44/18
Members were informed that there were no Public Questions.

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