Stockton-on-Tees Borough Council

Big plans, bright future

Children and Young People's Partnership Minutes

Date:
Wednesday, 15th February, 2017
Time:
1.30pm
Place:
Jim Cooke Conference Suite, Stockton Central Libraray, Stockton on Tees, TS18 1TU
 
Please note: all Minutes are subject to approval at the next Meeting

Attendance Details

Present:
Martin Gray (Chairman),

Priti Butler, Emma Champley, Chris Davis, Natasha Judge, Cllr Ann McCoy, Janet Mackie, Steve Rose, Jane Barker, Amanda Taylor
Officers:
Peter Bell, Eve Conner-McGill, Karen Morris, Paul Diggins
In Attendance:
Nathan Duff
Apologies for absence:
Bev Bearne, Helen Barker, Liz Boynton, Maryssa O'Connor, Hazel Ducker, Jo Heaney
Item Description Decision
Public
CHP
59/16
DECLARATIONS OF INTEREST
 
CHP
60/16
MINUTES OF THE MEETING HELD ON 18 JANUARY 2017
 
CHP
61/16
MINUTES OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S HEALTH AND WELLBEING COMMISSIONING GROUP - 4 JANUARY 2017
 
CHP
62/16
READING - IMPROVING OUTCOMES THROUGH PROMOTION OF PARENT CHILD
RESOLVED that the presentation and discussion be noted/actioned as appropriate.
CHP
63/16
FAIRER START
RESOLVED that, subject to any decision taken, in respect of the refresh of the CYP Plan, information sharing be identified as a priority piece of work for the Partnership, going forward.
CHP
64/16
REFRESH OF CHILDREN AND YOUNG PEOPLE'S PLAN
RESOLVED that the Partnership refocuses its work to achieve real change on a smaller number of defined partnership priorities.
CHP
65/16
PERFORMANCE REPORT
RESOLVED that the information and discussion be noted/actioned as appropriate.
CHP
66/16
FORWARD PLAN
RESOLVED that the information be noted.

Preamble

ItemPreamble
CHP
59/16
There were no declarations of interest.
CHP
60/16
The minutes of the meeting held on 18 January 2017 were confirmed as a correct record.
CHP
61/16
Members noted the minutes of the Children and Young People's Health and Wellbeing Commissioning Group held on 4 January 2017.
CHP
62/16
Members received a presentation regarding improving outcomes, through the promotion of parent-child reading.

Members noted that being read to daily and having a set bed time, by the age of 3, was likely to be predictive factors of a child's chance of being 'ready for school' and achieving good educational outcomes.

Members were provided with details of how libraries supported Parent-Child Reading.

Discussion could be summarised as follows:

- the issue of encouraging parents with low literacy ability to read to their children was raised. It was explained that the act of simply looking at a book with a parent was beneficial to the child. Additionally, it often encouraged parents to improve their literacy skills.

- midwifery services were trying to get people to read in utero to establish a reading routine at an early stage.

- the Hospital Trust indicated that consideration would be given to maintaining bedtime reading for children in hospital, via the ward play specialists.

- it was suggested that consideration needed to be given to encourage Mums to read to their children in domestic abuse refuges.

- issues of not reading to children were, perhaps, more prevalent in disadvantaged families, however, it was an issue in the more affluent families too, when parents had to work long hours or unusual shifts patterns.

- A Fairer Start Champion volunteers were involved in encouraging parent - child reading.

- in terms of establishing an evidence base it was noted that Bookstart was a national reading scheme but partners reported schemes in other parts of the country that targeted deprived areas and data may be available from these.

- it was noted that under the Bath, Book, Bed scheme Stockton was being provided with 2100 booklets that would provide tips and promote routine at bedtime. It was explained that a working group had been set up to look at how these booklets could be distributed in the most effective way to get maximum benefit from the resource.

Generally members felt that there should be some targeting of available resources to children from low income families and there was a suggestion that food-banks could be used to distribute unwanted books. There was a need to fully understand any available evidence about what interventions could achieve, before any expansion of what was currently provided was considered. The working group that had been established could research and consider these issues.
CHP
63/16
Members considered a report that had been compiled by the Fairer Start Steering Group, in order to highlight issues of information sharing that were hampering successful partnership working.

The main issues regarding a lack of information sharing were:

- live birth data was 3 years out of date.
- problems around the sharing of information
relating to the 2 year integrated check.

It was suggested that the problems being faced were not confined to A Fairer Start (AFS) and the Partnership was asked to consider a way forward that would assist AFS and any future initiatives.

There was a lengthy discussion relating to information sharing and the barriers that existed.

Members noted some local and national practice that facilitated information sharing.

Members agreed that this was an issue that needed further in-depth work and it was important to resolve it to enable the wider partnership and multi agency initiatives to work effectively in the future.
CHP
64/16
Members considered a report that presented initial proposals around the potential refresh of the Children and Young People's Plan and the role of the Partnership going forward.

Members agreed that there should be a shift of emphasis and the development of a small number of key priorities for joint working. This would see a re-focus in the work of the Partnership in seeking to achieve real change on a reduced number of priorities. Priority work may also involve resolving obstacles, like information sharing.

The re-focus would also see the Partnership spend more time engaging with young people and listening to the voice of the child.

Future performance reports would reflect the re-focus on a smaller number of priorities.
CHP
65/16
Members considered a report that provided a summary and commentary on performance to the end of Quarter 2 2016/17.

A framework would be developed around priorities and performance reports would be key to checking the success of the work to achieve those priorities. Future reports would be briefer, more focused and more in line with the charts, provided at this meeting, that related to Early Help Assessments (EHA). Timely comparator information would also be provided.

During discussion -

- within the EHA data charts, behaviour management was identified as the most prevalent reason for an EHA. Partners noted that this was only the presenting reason and the assessment process would draw out and look to deal with underlying issues through a plan. It was suggested that the issues highlighted in any plan needed to be part of the data-set to help with prevention initiatives.

- reports may need to provide data over various time periods, depending on the issue. Comparisons over quite lengthy periods were sometimes more appropriate than quarterly comparisons. Also, it was suggested that reports could include detail about activity resulting from any under-performance/areas of concern i.e. what was being done about it.
CHP
66/16
Members considered the Forward Plan

It was noted that the Forward Plan would be reviewed in the light of the Partnership's discussions, earlier in the meeting, relating to a refocus of the Partnership's work. Also, it was likely that items would be identified in the Forward Plan, as a result of discussions at the CYP Commissioning Group.

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